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How to School Your Kids on Energy Conservation

Posted by Scott Ranck on Sep 11, 2019, 8:12:50 AM

It is the time of year for crisp spiral notebooks and meeting your teacher. Whether you and your kids dread the return to early alarm clocks and after-school pickups, back-to-school season signals opportunity to learn new things. Since minds will soon be in “learning mode” why not make this the season to talk to your kids about energy conservation?

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When kids play a key role in your efforts to conserve energy and cut down on household bills, not only do they feel a sense of adult responsibility in improving their homes -- and perhaps school and communities -- they become healthier citizens too.

What can kids do to help you conserve energy? And how to talk to them about it without nagging? Here are some tips:

What can kids do?

  • Turn off the lights every time they leave a room
  • Turn off household appliances and gadgets when not in use
  • Use desktop lamps rather than overhead lights
  • Find natural ways to heat and cool your home: shutter blinds and drapes when it’s too hot, let in sunlight in when it’s chilly, crack open the windows for a gentle breeze in moderate temperatures
  • Get outside! Encourage outdoor activities during down time. Energy conservation can be yet another motivator to limit that dreaded screen time
  • Reuse, recycle, consider composting


How to Talk to Your Kids About Saving Energy

  • Tell them the ‘why’: Remind your kids why it’s important to turn off the lights and power down their devices. Show your kids the electric and gas bills each month, which often include a breakdown of usage.
  • Make it fun. Consider making a game out of energy conservation: a scavenger hunt to find all household appliances and gadgets that should be powered down, or a competition between parents and kids where points are awarded for “energy conserving” measures. If you use a chore chart or “reward” system for other good behaviors, consider making energy conservation a part of it.
  • Set an example. Are doing as you say, not as you do when it comes to powering down appliances? Make sure you’re modeling good energy saving behavior in your home.
  • Recognize and Reward. Recognize and reinforce it when your kids begin opting for a book instead of screen time, or when they are extra mindful to power down their computer and turn out the lights.

We are here to help:

For more tips on energy conservation for both natural gas and electric in your home, rebate programs  and other energy information, FPU has you covered.

 

Topics: Energy Conservation, Natural Gas, conservation

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